Prof Sarah Legge

Theme 1 Leader
The University of Queensland and The Australian National University

Sarah Legge is a Professor at the Australian National University and a Principal Research Fellow with the University of Queensland. She is a wildlife ecologist with 30 years of research and conservation management experience. She worked originally in behavioural and evolutionary ecology (evolution of sociality, mating systems, sex allocation, siblicide, intra-tropical migration).

Over the past 15 or so years, her work has spanned wildlife conservation research and management delivery. She has strong interests in monitoring and adaptive management, with much of that interest directed towards improving our understanding of the impacts of threats (especially fire and feral animals) on threatened and declining species, and finding ways to address those threats at landscape scales. Sarah developed a regional fire management project that won the Western Australia State Environment Award, and she was awarded the Serventy Medal by Birdlife Australia for her contribution to ornithological research. She worked in the non-profit conservation sector for over a decade, with a focus on the on-ground delivery of conservation management.

Sarah is a member of several advisory committees for conservation organisations or projects, including the Christmas Island Cat Eradication Project, Wild Deserts, Birdlife Australia’s Threatened Species Committee, the Purnululu World Heritage Advisory Committee, the National Academy of Science’s Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Committee, and Bush Heritage Australia’s Science and Conservation Committee. She also sits on the Commonwealth Government’s Threatened Species Scientific Committee, and its Feral Cat Taskforce.

Projects
Publications
Managing jila on Ngurrara Country
TSR Hub
Population responses to fires of varying severity for priority vertebrate and spiny crayfish species, and the extent to which management actions support recovery
TSR Hub
Cat ecology, impacts and management in Australia
Wildlife Research
Cat-dependent diseases cost Australia AU$6 billion per year through impacts on human health and livestock production
Wildlife Research
Edge effects created by fenced conservation reserves benefit an invasive mesopredator
Wildlife Research
Introduced cats eating a continental fauna: invertebrate consumption by feral cats (Felis catus) in Australia
Wildlife Research
Pre-eradication assessment of feral cat density and population size across Kangaroo Island, South Australia
Wildlife Research
Predation by introduced cats Felis catus on Australian frogs: compilation of species records and estimation of numbers killed
Wildlife Research
Science for Saving Species Magazine Issue 14 Summer 2020
TSR Hub
A checklist of attributes for effective monitoring of threatened species and threatened ecosystems
Journal of Environmental Management
After the catastrophe: a blueprint for a conservation response to large-scale ecological disaster
TSR Hub
Protecting Australian mammals from introduced cats and foxes: Australia’s haven network
TSR Hub
The short-term response of feral cats to rabbit population decline: Are alternative native prey more at risk?
Biological Invasions
Reading the black book: The number, timing, distribution and causes of listed extinctions in Australia
Biological Conservation
Cat impacts and management: Knowledge exchange for stakeholders
TSR Hub
Continental-scale assessment reveals inadequate monitoring for threatened vertebrates in a megadiverse country
Biological Conservation
Introduced cats (Felis catus) eating a continental fauna: inventory and traits of Australian mammal species killed
Biological Conservation - Mammal Review
How to ensure threatened species monitoring leads to threatened species conservation
Wiley
National monitoring priorities, process and prospectus for threatened species
TSR Hub
Monitoring threatened species and ecological communities - Factsheet
TSR Hub
Improving conservation assessments and policy options for poorly known species
TSR Hub
Science for Saving Species Magazine Issue 12 Winter 2019
TSR Hub
A knowledge synthesis to inform a national approach to fighting extinction
TSR Hub
Creation and analysis of a national database of threatened species on Australian islands
TSR Hub
Introduced cats (Felis catus) eating a continental fauna: The number of mammals killed in Australia
Biological Conservation
Karajarri Fire and Biodiversity Project
TSR Hub
Investigating feral cat control methods for western Kangaroo Island
TSR Hub
How many birds are killed by cats in Australia?
Science Direct - Elsevier
Compilation and traits of Australian bird species killed by cats
Science Direct - Elsevier
Australia Felix
Australian Birdlife
Protecting Australian mammals from introduced cats and foxes: The current status and future growth of predator-free havens
TSR Hub
How many reptiles are killed by cats in Australia?
CSIRO
Pirra Jungku: Contemporary and traditional fire management approaches in the desert
TSR Hub
Arid Zone Monitoring: Surveys for vertebrates across arid and semi-arid zones
TSR Hub
Arid zone monitoring project What’s it about?
TSR Hub
Recovering malleefowl with adaptive management of feral predators
TSR Hub
Fire, predators and the endangered northern bettong
TSR Hub
Systematic planning can rapidly close the protection gap in Australian mammal havens
Conservation Letters
Threats to Australia’s imperilled species and implications for a national response
TSR Hub
Getting strategic with havens
TSR Hub
Metrics of progress in the understanding and management of threats to Australian birds
Conservation Biology
Science for Saving Species Magazine Issue 9 Spring 2018
TSR Hub
Feral cat control for threatened species in Queensland
TSR Hub
The threats to Australia's imperilled species and implications for a national conservation response
CSIRO
The conservation of Greater Glider populations in the Victorian Central Highlands
TSR Hub
How to improve threatened species management: An Australian perspective
Elsevier
What 15 years of monitoring is telling us about mammals in Booderee National Park
TSR Hub
Using reintroductions to understand causes of mammal declines and extinctions at Booderee National Park
TSR Hub
Improving conservation assessments and policy options for poorly known species
TSR Hub
Conservation conundrums and the challenges of managing unexplained declines of multiple species
Elsevier
Havens for threatened Australian mammals: the contributions of fenced areas and offshore islands to the protection of mammal species susceptible to introduced predators
CSIRO
Feral cat distribution, abundance, management and impacts on threatened species: collation and analysis of data
TSR Hub
Optimising the benefits of feral cat control on Christmas Island
TSR Hub
Monitoring for threatened species and ecological communities
TSR Hub
Science for Saving Species Magazine Issue 6 Summer 2018
TSR Hub
Australia's mammal fauna requires a strategic and enhanced network of predator-free havens
Nature Research
Adaptive Management for threatened mammals in the Victorian Central Highlands
TSR Hub
Integrated management of feral herbivores and feral predators
TSR Hub
Mammals on 'arks'
TSR Hub
Staving off extinction – more than luck and fate
Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
Science for Saving Species Magazine Issue 5 Spring 2017
Threatened Species Recovery Hub
Male-male pair bonding, nesting and egg incubation in a wild passerine
Journal of Ornithology
Developing a Threatened Species Index
TSR Hub
Wings of tropical finches: interspecific differences in shape are consistent with levels of mobility, but moult and feather fault patterns are more complex
Emu
Response of the Kangaroo Island Dunnart and other threatened species to a cat eradication program on Kangaroo Island
TSR Hub
Impacts and management of feral cats Felis catus in Australia
Mammal Review
Science For Saving Species Magazine: Issue 2 Summer 2016
Threatened Species Recovery Hub
The contribution of policy, law, management, research, and advocacy failings to the recent extinctions of 3 Australian vertebrate species.
Conservation Biology
Learning from loss
Wildlife Australia