Monitoring wiliji using cameras

Date: 23, Nov, 2021
Author(s):   Tyrone Lavery, Darraga John Watson, Payday Butt, Raymond Charles, Vern Chuguna, Richard Cox, Quinton Fiebig, Modra Green, Nathan Green, Marcus Johnson, Conan Lee, Shaquille Millindee, Tyrese Skeen, Albert Watson, Frank Watson, Kimberley Watson, William Watson, Josiah Wise, Wade Blanchard, Mark Eldridge, Damien Giles, Alexandra James, Sarah Legge, David Lindenmayer, David Pearson, Darren Southwell, Walalakoo Aboriginal Corporation, Alexander Watson, John Woinarski, Leigh-Ann Woolley
Publisher: TSR Hub

Walalakoo Aboriginal Corporation and the Yimardoowarra Nyikina Mangala Rangers have been looking after wiliji in the Nyikina and Mangala Native Title Determination, which is the only place this type of rock-wallaby lives. Yimardoowarra Nyikina Mangala Rangers with the support of WWF used camera traps from 2012-2018 to find wiliji in the Erskine (Malarabba), Grant and Edgar Ranges. The Rangers wanted to use their wiliji camera trap surveys to see how many wiliji live in the ranges, and if the numbers of wiliji change over time. They worked with a scientist from the Australian National University who tested new ways to use the photos to answer these questions.